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of benghazi. a total of four americans were killed, america vowed there will be justice, turns out 911 was a bad day for overseas, protesters in cairo scaled the wall and embassy. destroyed the american flag in cairo and egypt, and then in benghazi, where we begin tonight, we have our chief foreign correspondent, richard, engel. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian, we hoped to broadcast in front of the u.s. embassy here in cairo, but had to leave as egyptian security forces clashed with the demonstrators there, pushing them back, using tear gas to try to stop assaults like the ones yesterday, which we are learning much more about. two attacks on u.s. buildings, one here in cairo, spontaneous, passion, harmless, the other in benghazi, focused and deadly. at 4:00, protesters in cairo answer a preacher's call on tv to go to the u.s. embassy to denounce a u.s. video made in the u.s. that insulted islam. they say they want to stop the movie about to premier, by 6:00, the protesters scaled the embassy, ripping down the u.s. flag. nobody is hurt, but egyptian police are noticeably
't hurt anybody inside. in benghazi, the more we learn about it, the less like that it seemed. it was a commando-style raid in benghazi where militants may have been angry about this same video, but they clearly moved in with a military-style tactic. they had rpgs. the attack on the consulate was carried thought two waves. that's the kind of thing in benghazi that is carried out by a militant group, by a terrorist group, by al qaeda potentially. and u.s. officials are looking into that right now. also wondering was it just a coincidence that the u.s. ambassador, who is normally based in tripoli, happened to be in benghazi at the very time of the attack. so a lot of questions. but it's clear now that these were two very different incidents. a spontaneous uprising that resulted in no casualties here in cairo, and a guerrilla assault in benghazi that killed the u.s. ambassador. richard engel, nbc news, cairo. >> the story is obviously global, but the emotion is very local. ambassador stevens went to piedmont high school and then to uc berkeley. tonight his friends and family are
the cradle of the arab spring in cairo, where the ambassador was stormed. benghazi, the attack that killed four americans, including the first ambassador to die in decades. this was a somber day at andrew's air force base as the four americans came home, as the leaders of their government looked on. it is where we begin our coverage tonight with nbc's andrea mitchell. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> reporter: to the mournful tones of "nearer my god to thee," the caskets came home, four public servants, arriving to the embrace of family and the secretary of state, brought together in grief. >> today, we bring home four americans who gave their lives for our country, and our values. >> reporter: four americans, the president said, who knew the danger and accepted it. they didn't simply embrace the american ideal, they lived it. >> glenn dougherty never shied from adventure, he believed in his life he could make a difference, by the calling as a navy seal. tyrone woods spent two decades as a navy seal, multiple tours in iraq and afghanistan. >> he had the arms of a healer and warrior. earning the distinct
happened in and around the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, the night four americans were killed, including the u.s. ambassador. aman mohadin is in benghazi once again for us tonight. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. well, the investigation into the killing of the americans here in benghazi intensifies. today there was a powerful message for greater unity in the region as protests continued against the american-made anti-islam preliminary. ♪ >> reporter: a prayer for peace in the heart of the middle east. pope benedict holding sunday mass in front of 300,000 worshippers. his message? reconciliation and tolerance. but there was little of either today as the demonstrations continued. also in lebanon today hundreds took to the streets in an anti-american protest. in pakistan hundreds of protesters clashed with police after demonstrators broke through a barrier near the u.s. consulate in karachi. protesters set american flags on fire. more than 100 people were arrested in paris while hundreds more gathered today in london. in tunisia where the protests were the most
pretoria to baghdad and finally to benghazi. the mission that drew chris and sean and their colleagues to libya is both noeble and necessary. we and the people of libya honor their memory by carrying it forward. this is not easy. today, many americans are asking, indeed, i asked myself, how could this happen. how could this happen in a country we helped liberate in a city we helped save from destruction. this question reflects just how complicated and, at times, how confounding, the world can be. but we must be clear-eyed even in our grief. this was an attack by a small and savage group. not the people or government libya. everywhere chris and his team went in libya, in a country scarred by war and tyranny, they were hailed as friends and partners. and when the attack came yesterday, libyans stood and fought to defend our post. some were wounded. libyans carried chris' body to the hospital and they helped rescue and lead other americans to safety. and last night, when i spoke to the president of libya, he strongly condemned the violence and pledged every effort to protect our people an
're learning more about the attack on the american consulate in benghazi, libya, which killed a u.s. ambassador and three other americans. the obama administration says it was a planned terrorist attack, and the fbi is investigating a possible al qaeda link, and an issue that secretary of state hillary clinton discussed today. meanwhile, ann curry sat down with the president of libya to discuss the situation. >> reporter: would you call the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi an act of terrorism? >> i have no doubt about that. and it is a pre-planned act of terrorism directed against american citizens. >> reporter: you're confirming that rpgs were used in the original attack? >> mortars -- >> reporter: they were used in the attack? >> yes. >> reporter: and do you know how many mortars were used? >> about 500. >> reporter: and you were saying they were fired with such accuracy that this could not have been done by somebody who didn't have experience? >> experience and knew what he was doing. >> reporter: and this is what is helping to convince you that this was a pre-planned attack, not a r
have available to us today, our current assessment is that what happened in benghazi in fact was initially a spontaneous reaction to what transpired hours before in cairo, almost a copycat of the demonstrations against our facility in cairo which were prompted of course by the video. >> there was a caveat there. she said the fbi was still investigating. but the thought was it was a spontaneous reaction. a couple of days before that, the libyan president said, no, in fact, al qaeda was behind this attack. and then days later, after ambassador rice is on this program and other programs, the president's spokesman jay carney says this. it is, i think, self-evident that what happened in benghazi was a terrorist attack. well, if it was self-evident, why didn't the president call this exactly what it was, an act of terror on the anniversary of 9/11? >> well, this is an event of great interest, obviously, to the public, to the news media. information was being provided realtime. obviously, you're going to know more two weeks after an event than a week after an event. and as ambassado
.s. embassy. then the terrible lightning attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, that left the u.s. ambassador and three other americans dead. the first ambassador murdered on the job in a generation. some of this is coming from an anti-islamic film made here in the u.s. and it appears there is violence aimed across the country in a big region. we begin tonight with our chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, who is back, where by the way they're reporting 200 injuries today. richard, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian, clashes are still continuing here, even at this late hour near the u.s. embassy, and they were not the only ones in this region. this mess in the middle east is not over yet. the protesters in yemen set out to destroy the american embassy, to punish an insult against islam. protesters climbed the perimeter fence, undeterred by the yemen security forces who tried to keep them back, with water canons the crowds pushed forward, and managed to get inside the embassy parking lot. smashing windows, torching vehicles, using a forklift to do even more dama
helped save from destruction? >> as the libyan president flew to benghazi to visit the destroyed consulate today, he said he deeply regretted the loss of life. >> we're doing our best to bring them to justice. >> the attack showed he does not have complete control of his country. in cairo where the united states turned its back on its old friend hosni mubarak, radicals are troying to destroy the embassy with running battles with riot police in tahrir square, tear gas and stones. it's ironic that with american diplomats inside the embassy who helped to give these demonstrators, these protestors a voice and allowed them to actually carry out this anti-american clashes that we're seeing right now. so what did washington think would happen if he won? as the new egyptian president morsi was campaigning to lead the world's biggest arab country in elections the u.s. supported, he used radical creatures to stump for him. >> without a doubt he doesn't support the violence. >> ed hussein, a former muslim extremist is now with the council on foreign relations. >> what motivates them is the
around the world for the four victims of the attack on the consulate in benghazi, libya, including ambassador chris stevens. >>> and there is political fallout as well. mitt romney taking heat from members of his own party for his criticism of the statement from the u.s. embassy in cairo following the initial demonstration there. this morning, we'll hear what president obama has to say about that. and we'll get reaction from republican senator john mccain. >>> we want to get right to nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel. he's in cairo for us once again. richard, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, savannah, from tahrir square. this the iconic place that became the scene of massive demonstrations from the united states, calling for more democracy. now, there is an ongoing clash here as some demonstrators are trying to attract u.s. embassy, which is right on the edge of this square and you can see fear gas being fired from egyptian security forces trying to keep the demonstrators away from the u.s. embassy wall. a similar scene today in yemen, as an angry mob a
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10

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